The State of Global Loyalty: A Conversation About South Africa (Series)

What does customer loyalty look like outside of the U.S.? How are companies around the world addressing the evolving challenges of customer retention? And what can U.S. loyalty marketers learn from their global counterparts? 

Welcome to our Global Loyalty Series! Seeking to find those answers, I recently posed questions to loyalty experts in our Maritz Global Partner Network, challenging them to offer insights  unique to their regions around the world. 

This week, I connect with Barry Coltham, Managing Director for Achievement Awards Group, with input from Richard Cramer, Director of Loyalty.

Over the past 26 years, Barry has been instrumental in building the company’s deep expertise in automotive, banking, healthcare, and retail verticals and leading major research-based initiatives. Barry has a Master’s degree in Business Leadership and is a Certified Human Performance Technologist through the International Society for Performance Improvement.

 

As the Director of Loyalty, Richard leads a team of passionate loyalty marketers and analytics experts to deliver sophisticated, creative loyalty solutions. He is a veteran advertising executive with deep understanding of big brands, consumer psychology and relationship marketing. Maritz has been a shareholder in Achievement Awards since 2000.

1. What are some of the biggest challenge companies in South Africa are facing when it comes to retaining loyalty program members? What opportunities do you see for these brands/marketers? 

The major challenge is ongoing member engagement once programs have launched. We now have over 130 loyalty programs in South Africa, many that offer the same type of rewards. The value propositions have been watered down due to the on-going cost of running the programs which has resulted in member disinterest. Research by Truth Loyalty in 2017 found a decrease in the number of programs that women participate in, from 6.1 programs down to 5.6, as well as a slight decrease in the number of programs men belong to. If brands want consumers to stay involved with their program and frequently engage with it, something needs to change. The opportunity in South Africa is to go beyond rewards and to engender emotional connection and customer experience.

2. What do you believe makes a loyalty program in South Africa successful? 

A great value proposition and simplicity, the ease of use of a program, and surprise and delight rewards that are personalized and make members feel special. Another important element is the integration of programs with partnerships that are relevant and add value to the members’ lives. We can see in South Africa that the top programs are the ones that are easy to use.

3. What cultural changes are you seeing in South Africa that are affecting customer loyalty? 

There is a big transition over to mobile, and more people using internet on mobile phones than laptops and more mobile phones than the overall population. There is a fragmented, costly media landscape that does not reach rural poorer communities – mobile phones are the only way to access these members.

4. What’s the biggest piece of advice you have for loyalty marketers? 

There should be an understanding that you will have to increase sales by 6% to pay for the loyalty program. Most programs in South Africa reduced their value propositions because they did not factor in the cost of running the program. Employ a Specialist Implementation Agency and SAAS platform with experience in running the programs. The loyalty program is an integral part of the company’s DNA.

5. What is the impact, if any, of government regulations on loyalty programs in South Africa? 

There are two major legal acts that impact loyalty programs in South Africa: The Consumer Protection Act (CPA) and the Protection of Personal Information Act (POPI).

First, the CPA states that loyalty credits or awards are a legal medium of exchange (like cash) when suppliers offer it as consideration for any goods or services offered.  Because the loyalty benefits are legal forms of exchange, the goods given in return will also be subject to the CPA. This means that consumers are fully protected against defective, unsafe and hazardous products in the same way as a consumer who purchased goods and services with cash or on credit. Under the CPA, suppliers have a duty to ensure that the goods offered to consumers in loyalty programmes are in stock. In most advertisements you will hear the “while stocks lasts”, “subject to availability” or “terms and conditions apply” at the end, which suppliers believe cover them if they are not able to satisfy the promises made. The other major legal act, The Protection of Personal Information, refers to how loyalty programs process a lot of personal information and the processing of this information must be done lawfully.

About Our Global Partners:

Maritz partners with top loyalty practitioners worldwide as part of the Global Strategic Partner Network.  Carefully vetted, trained in Maritz’ solutions and in regular communication with our solution leaders, Strategic Partners bring geographic market-specific expertise to our global clients. 

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